URBAN LEARNING - Integrative energy planning of urban areas
Collective learning for improved governance

Innovative energy technologies and supply options

To bridge the link between innovative technological solutions and urban planning processes, a comprehensive understanding and learning is required to support the institutionalisation of low carbon development of both new and existing city areas. This section is part of WP2 and summarizes good practise examples from the UL-cities and cities outside the consortium, which promote low-carbon development by applying both, innovative technical solutions as well as good-practise planning and implementation approaches.

Description of urban development sites with innovative energy technologies and supply options

Description of projects with innovative energy technologies and supply options

ZagEE

E2STORMED

South axis Amsterdam (Zuidas) - a multifunctional land use project

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

South axis Amsterdam is a high-rise city development. With its 1.2 Million m2 of international offices, 800,000 m2 living space and another 1.4 Million m2 amenities (e.g. hospital and university) this project is considered of paramount importance as it brings together ‘working’ and ‘living’ land functions. Located between the old city centre and the Schiphol International Airport, Zuidas provides ideal space for both functions. Not only is the area optimized for bicycle and public transport but a highway is being built underground. Furthermore, the majority of the buildings are labelled A (the most energy efficient) according to the Dutch energy label for buildings (scaling A to G).

Technologies used: City heating HT and City cooling system, Breeam excellent, Collective Breeam monitoring.

More info

https://www.amsterdam.nl/zuidas/english/about-zuidas/

 

 

 

Houthhavens Amsterdam

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

This project aims for urban transformation, offering offices, housing and amenities such as schools and hotels just outside the city centre. The project in progress is to offer 2,700 dwellings with 20 percent social housing.

Technologies used: City heating HT (CHP-plant using waste and biomass) and City cooling using surface, water and seasonal storage

More info

https://www.amsterdam.nl/projecten/houthaven/

 

 

 

Märkisches Viertel

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

The urban redevelopment area “Märkisches Viertel” in Berlin was the biggest low-energy housing refurbishment project in Germany with a total investment of ca. 560 Million Euro. Beside the energy efficient building refurbishment, a biomass cogeneration system (CHP plant) was installed in 2014. It was the first CHP plant in Berlin fuelled entirely by biomass. Thus, it generates heat with especially low environmental impacts, burning over 70,000 tonnes/year wood chips (forest residues) and untreated wood.

More info

http://www.stadtentwicklung.berlin.de/staedtebau/foerderprogramme/
stadtumbau/Maerkisches-Viertel.4221.0.html#c25087

 

 

 

Adlershof

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

Adlershof is a young science-, technology- and media centre in southeast Berlin, a rather suburban area. With its research and innovation centre Adlershof provides a perfect location for testing and applying new technologies. The science city has its own energy strategy until 2020, within which innovative projects for energy efficiency are developed and implemented locally.

Technologies used: LowEx network research project, Power-2-heat/gas.

More info

http://www.adlershof.de/en/

 

 

 

EnergyLab Nordhavn – New Urban Energy Infrastructures

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

A former industrial area is being transformed into an entirely new, sustainable district. Nordhavn in Copenhagen is Scandinavia’s largest urban development project, providing space for 40,000 residents and 40,000 jobs. The project is testing future energy solutions in a real-life energy laboratory serving as a showroom for further Smart City aspects and technologies.

Low-temperature district heating/cooling system and heat exchanger are to ease the way for heat sources, such as surplus heat, solar heating and geothermal heat. Buildings will be able to exchange heat and cooling with each other.

More info

http://www.energylabnordhavn.dk/

 

 

 

Clichy Batignolles – an ambitious eco-district project

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

Clichy-Batignolles is located in the 17th district of Paris. Its eco-district project aims to transform an rather industrial shaped land. The area includes an already existing 10 ha park, which is assigned to be the centre of the district. By 2020, the new neighbourhood should bring together 7,500 inhabitants and 12,700 jobs.

The eco-district is an extensive model for sustainable urban development - not just being energy efficient (low-energy buildings, using geothermal and solar energy) but maintaining social diversity (50% social housing, 20% capped-rent housing and 30% housing at market prices), reducing greenhouse gas emissions and preserving biodiversity (greenery at project site, rainwater collecting and watering system).

More info

http://www.clichy-batignolles.fr/sites/default/files/exe_web_cb_dossierpresse-en.pdf

 

 

 

ZAC Claude Bernard (PNE) – mixed development zone

Purpose of the element

Urban area transformation

Description of the element

This urban renewal project was carried out on land left fallow since the early 1990s (urban wasteland) in northeast Paris. Now it is offering housing, offices, businesses and services, public facilities and infrastructure as well as public and green spaces. The project provides about 2.7 hectares of green areas including the ecological reserve, the linear forest, serving areas of buildings and 3,668 m2 of green roofs, on a 14.6-hectare operation (nearly 18.5%).

During design of the ZAC, RT 2005 was in force. The Climate Plan of Paris, adopted in 2007, imposes a housing primary energy consumption of 50 kWh(pe)/m2 /year. ZAC Claude Bernard, designed upstream, has been an exception in bringing this consumption to the BBC level 65 kWh(ep)/m2/year according to RT 2005. The offices are all THPE. Housing is certified with the certificate BBC Home & Environment A1 Performance2 profile option (Cerqual). The offices have tertiary HQE certification (Certivéa). For businesses, BNP Paribas made an audit of the management system by Elan their AMO.

More info

http://www.ekopolis.fr/sites/default/files/docs-joints/EKP-AAM-1303-ClaudeBernard.pdf